Upper Egypt.. The land beyond the temples

Development is about adaptation and innovation, and with that comes poverty reduction. The problem with the poor communities of developing countries, especially the rural ones, is that they are still stuck in a time capsule, all the while their population is growing and natural resources are diminishing. Fortunately, there are many ways to overcome these problems. Unfortunately though, the snag is in introducing them to new methods; i.e. getting them to adapt to innovative solutions.

NGOs play an evidently important role in the development of poor communities in the developing world. ENID is an example of an effectively successful program that contributes with creating more job opportunities and supporting food production and security in rural Upper Egypt.  ENID’s “Sustainable Agricultural Development” program, led by Dr. Dyaa Abdou, is one that focuses on promoting agricultural development. It works to increase the utilization efficiency of scarce natural resources as well as building the capacity of both the rural youth and women to produce and innovate.

The Sustainable Agricultural Development program supports a number of activities that aim at developing the agricultural environment and build the capacity of both the rural people as well as NGOs and governmental sectors to work together. Dr. Abdou highlights the main activities and how they are expected to benefit and up the welfare of Upper Egypt’s rural community. These include:

Integrated Fish Farms

These farms depend on solar power units to extract underground water. The integrated aspect to them emanates from the various agricultural activities hosted on the farms; including food and feed plantations, livestock, recycling agricultural waste to produce organic compost and finally producing Bio Gas to satisfy local needs for electricity/power (e.g. light, heat, cooking… etc.).

Read more of this post

Recommendations on Egyptian labor market policies

This is a playlist for experts who were generous enough to give us a few minutes to inform the public about research they are undergoing on Labor issues in Egypt, challenges, opportunities, hick-ups, and lay a knowledge-based perspective of how things look like especially from 2006 up to 2012. Since, readers are currently employed, or were employed at some point in someway,  I would assume that Egyptians or those interested in the Egyptian labor market,  will find this playlist particularly useful.

A bit of background:
The Economic Research Forum (ERF) held a dissemination event to announce the public release of the 2012 round of the Egypt Labor Market Panel Survey (ELMPS 2012), which was carried out by ERF in cooperation with Egypt’s Central Agency for Public Mobilization and Statistics (CAPMAS). The public release of the ELMPS 2012 data provides an important opportunity for researchers to better understand the Egyptian labor market in the wake of the global financial crisis and the 25th of January, 2011 revolution. (ERF website)

Read more of this post