Researcher policymaker: A missing bridge?

Knowledge Café

Knowledge Café

It’s quite amazing the amount of time and effort that southern researchers invest to research their ideas and present them to the world, despite the numerous challenges they face throughout this path. And ohh the pride they take in that! The role of communication is to define how big that “world” is.. It could be anything from a desk drawer to an implemented policy.

In most developing countries, unfortunately, the odds are that most research ends up warm and cozy in an office desk drawer. Not to sound satirical, it’s no secret that developing countries are hardly “the place” for hearing out what the people have to say, let alone the researchers who go out of their way to not only add to their own knowledge but to contribute to bringing about change in their societies. With that said, it’s not quite safe to blame it all on bad communication now, is it?

This blog post is supposed to highlight some of the challenges that African researchers face in “doing” research and “communicating” it to inform and advice policy. Wrapping up our latest GDNet-AERC Policy Brief Training Workshop, we picked some of the participants’ brains regarding that particular topic.

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Understanding inclusive growth: Effective policies for more inclusive societies

By definition, inclusive growth entails the equitable allocation of resources in order to generate benefits that can be incurred by all sectors of the society, thus alleviating poverty and inequality. However, is inclusive growth necessarily pro-poor? And does it ensure reducing the troubles of the most disadvantaged while benefiting everyone? There is yet no clear coherent measure to combine all the dimensions of inclusive growth that involves how the elements of inclusiveness relate to each other and ultimately how they can collectively induce growth.

Rafael Ranieri from the Ministry of Planning, Budget and Management, Brazil presented a paper titled “Inclusive growth: Building up a concept” at the GDN 14th Annual Conference. He tackled the state of the debate on the concepts of inclusive growth and pro-poor growth; highlighting distinctive features of the concept of inclusive growth and contributing to the design of more effective policies through addressing the main issues that can take it further. He argues that, unlike pro-poor growth concepts, inclusive growth is not limited to income outcomes but is rather concerned with the process of growth. In other words, people must actively participate in the growth process for it to be inclusive.

Greater clarity about the meaning of inclusive growth is important to determining clearer policy objectives and thus to designing more effective policies to create more inclusive societies. In their paper, Ranieri and Raquel A. Ramos from the Centre d’Economie de Paris Nord, France emphasize that actual manifestation of inclusion in public policy make a country more resilient to change in the long term, taking into consideration the distinct nature of national concerns and social forces in each country.

                Rafael Ranieri, Ministry of Planning, Budget and Management, Brazil

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“Spaces for engagement” at the International Conference on Evidence-Informed Policy Making

The program  “Spaces for engagement: Using evidence to improve public decisions”, a GDNet initiative implemented in Latin America by the Center of Public Policies promoting Equity and Growth (CIPPEC), was presented at the International Conference on Evidence-Informed Policy Making, held in Ile-Ife, Nigeria on February 27-29, 2012.

Organized by the International Network for the Availability of Scientific Publications (INASP), the conference brought together researchers with an interest in the use of evidence in policy making, as well as decision makers from different policy making institutions in an effort to understand both the incentives which drive policy makers to look for research information and their capacity to find and evaluate it.

CIPPEC was invited by INASP to present the different strategies and lessons learned from this five-year program, aiming at strengthening the capacity of Latin American Policy Research Institutes (PRIs) in influencing public policies and promoting South-South collaboration between them and African and Asian organizations.

To learn more about the program, check out the full presentation: